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Posted from: https://www.recruiter.com/i/what-jobs-would-game-of-thrones-characters-have-in-the-real-world/

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Now that the season seven of Game of Thrones is here, it's time to answer the burning question on everybody's mind: If the characters had to schlep it in the real world, how would they find gainful employment?

Thanks to a new infographic from the resume-builder Novoresume, you don't have to rack your brain too hard puzzling it all out. Check below to see what

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Employers will get the opportunity to offer feedback on changes to the regulation governing which workers are eligible for overtime pay after the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) published a Request for Information (RFI) in the Federal Register on July 26.What's Next

On July 25, the DOL announced it would publish the RFI and released a preliminary copy. The RFI is the latest action on a rule issued in May 2016 during the Obama administration. Implementation of the rule would have added approximately 4.2 million employees to the ranks of workers eligible for overtime pay of at least 1½ times their regular rate of pay for hours worked in excess of 40 in a workweek.

The rule hasn’t taken effect because of a federal court injunction. In June, the DOL announced that it had decided not to defend the rule in court.

The rule, as issued in 2016, more than doubles the current minimum salary workers must earn to be exempt from the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). Being exempt from the FLSA makes workers ineligible to collect overtime pay, even when they work more than 40 hours in a workweek. The current threshold is $23,660 a year ($455 a week). The new rule puts the threshold at $47,476 a year ($913 a week).

To determine whether an employee can be classified as exempt, both her salary and her duties are considered. In addition to meeting the minimum salary threshold, a worker must perform duties that are primarily executive, administrative, or professional. The 2016 rule immediately triggered opposition from employers, which maintained that the salary test change was too drastic.

What to Expect Now

“We may be back at square one on revisions to the overtime rule,” says Mark B. Wiletsky, a contributor to Colorado Employment Law Letter and attorney in the Boulder, Colorado, office of Holland & Hart LLP. In publishing the RFI, “the DOL essentially starts the whole process of revising the overtime rule again. It suggests that the rule in its current form is unlikely to go into effect.”

Wiletsky says Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta has indicated that the DOL isn’t opposed to raising the minimum salary level for the white-collar exemptions. Instead, the opposition is to raising the salary level as high as it’s set in the 2016 rule.

The DOL may seek to simplify the exemption tests and offer employers more time to comply with the changes, Wiletsky says.

Reggie Gay, a contributor to South Carolina Employment Law Letter and attorney with the McNair Law Firm in Greenville, South Carolina, says the new development on the overtime rule likely means that employers can expect an increase in the minimum salary threshold but not as much as under the 2016 rule.

“It has been a considerable period of time since the last increase, and in fairness[,] an increase is overdue,” Gay says. “This being said, the increase should be reasonable and not overly burdensome on employers.”

One of the questions the DOL asks in the RFI concerns whether the salary threshold should be automatically updated on a periodic basis. Gay says such an adjustment may be appropriate. “This could be based on something similar to Social Security adjustments, and, if it is every three years or so, it will enable an employer to plan and budget,” he says. He said that in addition to changes in the salary test, the duties test should be updated to conform with modern-day forms of employment.

RFI Questions

The text of the RFI traces the history of the salary test and explains that for more than 75 years, the law has interpreted exempt employees to be workers whose job primarily involves executive, administrative, or professional duties. Since the FLSA became law in 1938, the minimum salary level for exempt employees has been updated as salary levels have increased. The current $455-per-week level has been in effect since 2004.

The RFI seeks comments on 11 questions. One question asks for comments on whether updating the 2004 salary level for inflation is an appropriate basis for setting a standard salary level. The question also asks what measure of inflation commenters think should be used.

Another question asks for comments on whether the regulation should contain multiple standard salary levels and, if so, how the levels should be set­—for example, by employer size, census region, census division, state, metropolitan statistical area, or another method.

Another question asks whether the DOL should set different standard salary levels for the executive, administrative, and professional exemptions and, if so, whether there should be a lower salary for executive and administrative employees. The RFI also asks whether the standard salary level in the 2016 rule effectively eclipses the role of the duties test in determining exempt status.

Further, the RFI seeks information from employers that increased the salaries of exempt employees in anticipation of the 2016 rule taking effect. It asks what actions were taken and what impact they have had.

Another question asks if relying solely on a duties test—and not considering salary at all—would be preferable to the current system, which considers an employee’s duties and pay. During his confirmation hearing in March, Acosta questioned whether a salary test is even appropriate under the law.

Tammy Binford writes and edits news alerts and newsletter articles on labor and employment law topics for BLR web and print publications. In addition, she writes for HR Hero Line and Diversity Insight, two of the ezines and blogs found on HRHero.com.

The post DOL Seeking Feedback on Long-Debated Overtime Rule appeared first on HR Daily Advisor.

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Posted from: http://hrdailyadvisor.blr.com/2017/07/26/advisory-body-calls-hhs-rescind-plan-identifier-rule/

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A federal advisory committee called on the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to rescind a 2012 rule that established a standard unique identifier for health plans.

HIPAA

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A hearing held in May by the National Committee in Vital and Health Statistics (NCVHS) confirmed the emerging industry consensus that HHS’ health plan identifier (HPID) is no longer needed, NCVHS advised HHS Secretary Tom Price in a June 21 letter.

Establishment of the HPID was directed by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), and reiterated by the Affordable Care Act (ACA), to facilitate the standardization of electronic health care transactions. However, when the rule was set to take effect in November 2014, HHS postponed its enforcement in the face of growing concern from health plans and providers alike.

Testimony at the most recent hearing “overwhelmingly affirmed that there is no longer an industry need for the HPID in the HIPAA standard transaction sets,” according to the letter from NCVHS Chair William Stead. “Testifiers concurred that the transaction routing challenges of two decades ago have been resolved by the industry and that implementation of the HPID would be disruptive, costly, and counterproductive to administrative simplification.”

Therefore, NCVHS recommended that HHS:

  1. Rescind its September 2012 final rule that required health plans to obtain and use the HPID;
  2. Communicate this intention to all industry stakeholders as soon as the decision is made, with guidance on the rescission’s effect; and
  3. Continue its “enforcement discretion” policy until the formal rescission of the rule is published.

NCVHS acknowledged that HHS has had additional uses in mind for the HPID, including enforcement of a proposed requirement for health plans to certify compliance with HIPAA transaction standards. “As industry needs or policy objectives become clearer, NCVHS may consider non-transaction applications of a health plan identifier for consideration in its future work plans,” according to the letter.

The HPID rule established a unique health plan identifier for HIPAA-covered health plans, and an “other entity” identifier for entities like third-party administrators that are not health plans but perform plan functions. Employer-sponsored group health plans (both fully insured and self-insured) were to obtain their own HPIDs.

NCVHS, an advisory committee made up of stakeholders across the health care industry, was designated by HIPAA and the ACA to advise HHS on standard transactions, identifiers, and data privacy issues.

The post Advisory Body Calls for HHS to Rescind Plan Identifier Rule appeared first on HR Daily Advisor.

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Article by Gemma Hartley

As a freelancer, you get to be fully on charge of your time. It is both freeing and daunting.

On the one hand, you can cultivate a life that reflects your priorities and has tremendous flexibility and opportunity. On the other hand, you could wind up wasting your time, falling short …

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(Editor’s Note: Today’s post is brought to you by Readex Research, which provides expert survey services to help businesses understand their internal and external customers. Their services include employee experience surveys. Enjoy the post!)

Let’s say your organization has conducted your employee engagement survey. You’ve used the principles of survey research to design the survey. The survey was implemented well and received high participation.

Now, employees will expect to hear something about the results.

employee engagement, employee engagement survey, engagement survey, survey results, Readex, spark

I’ve always said that the absolute worst thing companies can do is ask employees for their thoughts and then do nothing with the information. The whole purpose of a survey is to take action.

  • Action demonstrates that the company is listening to employees.
  • It shows that the company is open to new ideas from every level of the organization.
  • Taking action creates employee engagement.
  • Trust builds between employees and the company when action is taken.

Just to be clear, taking action doesn’t mean that organizations have to say “yes” to every suggestion. But it also doesn’t mean you can say “no” either. Once the employee engagement survey results are in, organizations have three action steps:

Step 1 – Digest the information

It’s very easy to get consumed by the wealth of information provided in surveys. Organizations need to be careful they don’t fall into the trap of analysis paralysis. It’s important to be mindful of the things you learn that need to be changed/improved. We can have built-in biases and skepticism of overall survey results that lean in a bad or negative direction.

I asked Readex CEO Jack Semler if there’s a formula for digesting survey information. “Digesting survey results is kind of like writing a paper.  You write and write, put the paper down, and the next time you pick it up you invariably find something to change or a new idea.  Well, it’s the same thing when you are reviewing survey results.  The second and even third time around there are new ideas that pop up or you see what you saw before in a different way.  There’s nothing wrong with taking time to digest and reflect.”

Equally as important is not spending enough time processing the responses. Don’t let initial reactions drive your process. Review the results, then put them down for a while, and review them again. Semler says there’s no overarching rule of thumb on how much time to allocate. “It could depend on the length of the survey (how much info there is) and any deadlines from other stakeholders on reporting.  I would say two to three reviews is typically sufficient to gain clarity.”

Step 2 – Communicate the results

After HR has processed the survey results internally, share information with key executives first, before sharing with the entire workforce. The group can then decide on how and how much of the results will be shared with the employees in advance. If specific feedback needs to be shared with an individual, schedule a one-on-one meeting to deliver the results. It shows that the company values the feedback as well as the person it’s being given to.

When it comes time to present the results to employees, think about the best way to conduct this meeting. It shouldn’t be like the weekly staff meeting. Conveying employee survey results is different and, dare I say, special.

I once worked for a company that did something unique for employee survey meetings that worked well. We called it a “max-mix” meeting because it provided maximum participation by a mixture of people. Here’s the meeting agenda:

The senior management team delivered an overview of the company results. Speaking of presenting results to employees, consider the use of graphs, charts, and other visuals to show results. Data tables and numbers aren’t always as presentation-friendly. For some creative inspiration in designing visuals, check out the TEDx talk “How to Avoid Death by PowerPoint”.

Then, employees worked in groups to develop questions for the senior management team. Each team designated a spokesperson to ask the question. Senior management didn’t know who initiated the question. And the spokesperson was typically someone who was comfortable speaking in front of groups.

For any questions that there wasn’t enough time for, were put on index cards. HR was responsible for getting the answers and posting the responses in writing for all employees to view.

Step 3 – Make decisions using the results

After holding the all-employee meeting, let employees know how and when action items from the survey will be addressed. It’s realistic to think that some suggestions can and will be implemented right away, others might need further research, and some will not be feasible for a variety of reasons.

Readex, Readex Research, logo, employee engagement, survey research

Senior management will want to decide how employees will learn when survey suggestions have been implemented or are under consideration (i.e. company email, employee newsletter, on the website, or multiple channels). They will also want to decide how to communicate when suggestions will not be considered (i.e. department meetings, employee town halls, or possibly one-on-one conversations.)

Last and certainly not least, HR and senior management need to thank employees for their participation and communicate details for future surveys. If employees feel their feedback was openly accepted, carefully considered, and acted upon, they will continue to offer feedback.

Three key steps to turn employee engagement survey results into actionClick To Tweet

Employee Engagement is Good for Business

I’d like to think that I don’t have to convince anyone that employee disengagement is bad for business. We’ve all seen the Gallup report stating that actively disengaged employees cost the U.S. $550 billion annually in lost productivity.

Organizations must address employee engagement and take steps to improve it. But instead of guessing about what to do, survey employees and find out what they’re thinking. Then do something.

Readex has created a series of white papers to help with your employee engagement survey design and implementation. You might want to bookmark these links for future reference:

5 Questions to Ask Yourself about Employee Engagement Surveys

6 Guidelines for Employee Engagement Survey Design

3 Tips for Presenting Employee Engagement Survey Results

Readex, whitepapers, employee engagement surveys, employee engagement, engagement survey

The post HOW TO: Turn Your Employee Engagement Survey Results into Action appeared first on hr bartender.

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Given all the best practices, job seeker expectations, and new technologies with which recruiters have to keep up, it can be easy for even the best of them to feel like they drowning.

Underneath all the gadgets and trends, though, recruiting is a skills-based field. If recruiters master the right ones, they'll be successful — no matter what changes come to the industry.

In today's episode of The Recruiting Reel

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Posted from: https://www.recruiter.com/i/how-to-find-the-right-resume-writing-service-for-you/

Interesting help and advice coming from FaceBook.
As part of our continuing assistance to each of our visitors to the HR Training Courses website we provide several blog posts from many other websites that have already been published on our FaceBook Page that our team believes will be of relevance to our visitors. We hope you will enjoy this extra content and find value in it.
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Selecting the right resume-writing service involves more than finding someone who can string together a few sentences. You need someone who can effectively summarize your attributes, experience, and knowledge in a format that flows while making you stand out from other applicants.

If you're in need of a resume-writing service, keep the following criteria in mind:

1. Experience Counts

Rather than relying on a single person who has limited …

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Fascinating information coming from FaceBook.
As a part of our ongoing assistance to all our visitors to this HR Training Courses website we have some articles from other websites that have already been uploaded on our FaceBook Page that our team believes will be of relevance to our readers. We really hope you will enjoy this extra content and find value in it.
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Peer pressure in your 50s? Really?

My friends and I were sitting around a table outside of a restaurant in Scottsdale. There were no bugs, no wind, no humidity. It was 75 degrees and perfect. People who retire to Florida have simply never been to the West Coast.

Eventually, the conversation turned to a common question: "What's your plan?"

My friends and I will get little sympathy. I've read

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Posted from: https://www.recruiter.com/i/to-build-a-better-workplace-reputation-balance-humility-and-confidence/

Interesting info from FaceBook.
As a part of our continuing service to each of our visitors to the HR Training Courses website we also include some posts from some other websites that have already been published on our FaceBook Page that we believe will be of relevance to our visitors. We believe you will enjoy this extra content and find value in it.
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People consistently name "confidence" as the most important key to making a good impression in the workplace. It makes sense: We like to work with individuals who feel strongly about their convictions and can be counted on to drive efforts forward.

That being said, I personally don't believe that confidence – though essential – is the most important quality for making a strong impression. Rather, I'd argue that confidence should come second …

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Interesting information and facts coming from FaceBook.
As a part of our ongoing assistance to all of our visitors to the HR Training Courses website we include several blog posts from some other websites that have been published on our FaceBook Page that we believe will be of relevance to our readers. We hope you will like this extra content and the value in it.
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As a leader, you've interviewed hundreds of candidates during your career. You know what you're doing, right? You're running from meeting to meeting, and you've got that interview at two 0'clock sharp with what's-his-name. Who cares, right? All the pertinent information is in the Outlook invite.

This is the common thought process of many leaders when it comes to hiring, and yet hiring can be a make-or-break factor in your …

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